25 °C Singapore, SG
January 25, 2021
Latest News
New York Times: Electric Cars Are Cheaper & Cleaner JinkoSolar Begins Construction On 20 Gigawatt Solar Cell Factory Asia Pacific to reduce cost of front-of-the-meter battery storage by 30% Reformed trade rules can help to save the climate Science warns world of ‘ghastly’ future ahead Kerry climate team begins to take shape Australia not among 50 countries vowing to protect 30 per cent of land and sea by 2030 Investors pressure HSBC to take stronger action to phase out coal financing Morgan Stanley takes stake in SolMicroGrid in a nod toward Energy-as-a-Service model Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz triples its electric car sales as CEO predicts a ‘transformative’ decade IEEFA Indonesia: PLN has ‘Green Ambition’ but is short on renewable energy credibility 2021: The Decarbonization Race Is On From climate ambition to renewables realization – are you hopeful for a better 2021? Improving energy storage will be crucial to a smooth energy transition Major US pension fund plans fossil-free future EV Battery Packs ~50% Cheaper Than In 2016 A $7 trillion climate change warning to the stock market from its biggest shareholder World still warms in 2020 as greenhouse gases fall Human handiwork’s mass exceeds world lifeforms China and Australia face a climate tipping point Lunaz Electric Classic Range Rover Collection Includes 007’s Roofless Off-Roader Analysis: When might the world exceed 1.5C and 2C of global warming? Proposed steep tariff cut risks disruption in Vietnam’s wind market, industry body warns Is South Korea on the right path to carbon neutrality? Rising ocean heat leaves fish gasping for oxygen World Bank helps developing countries’ wind spurt Project on biomass gasification technology launched Green hydrogen, Holy Grail for long-term energy storage, getting supermajors’ attention Ford unveils new electric van for its profitable commercial business Greek island ditches fossil fuel cars to go green

How Bloomberg would tackle climate change

Bloomberg would factor in climate risks and community impacts in all environmental reviews and in the Office of Management and Budget’s annual budget process. It would also stop federal agencies from defending the Trump administration’s rollbacks of emission regulations in court while a Bloomberg administration develops stronger limits on pollutants. The administration would also beef up enforcement staff at the Environmental Protection Agency.

What are the weaknesses in the proposal?

It includes no estimates of what the proposals would cost, or details on how a Bloomberg administration would pay for it. It would also face certain legal challenges from the oil and gas industry that would argue a wholesale shutdown of down coal- and natural-gas fired plants within a decade or two would decimate the economy and its large workforce. That plan also overlooks emissions from cars and trucks, a huge source of carbon dioxide.

How much would it cost?

The only figure in the plan is the $25 billion dedicated to R&D — which would be a tiny fraction of what the plan’s total cost.

How would he pay for it?

A Bloomberg administration would halt all subsidies for fossil fuel development, which it says cost “billions of dollars.” No other funding source is mentioned.

What have other Democrats proposed?

Other Democratic candidates have focused on stopping oil and gas drilling on public land, and in the case of Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, banning hydraulic fracturing. Bloomberg’s plan focuses on the demand side of the equation, aiming to end utilities’ use of fossil fuels.

Who would it help?

The plan would benefit solar and wind power companies with tax credits, quicker permitting and promises to improve transmission lines. It would also help companies working on next-generation battery and hydrogen technology. The plan also would aid communities suffering from pollution and low-income areas that are at risk from a changing climate.

Who opposes it?

Fossil fuel companies and many electric utilities, as well as Republicans who and centrist Democrats who supported jobs in the oil, gas and coal sectors.

Source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *