28 °C Singapore, SG
April 19, 2021
Latest News
Loss of Arctic sea ice can spoil French wine harvest Southeast Asia to establish its own framework for green investments, but natural gas remains a feature Major Asian bank says it’s not practical in the short term to cut off clients in the coal business Volkswagen Reveals the ID.6 CROZZ and ID.6 X Guest post: How finance from rich nations could drive 40% of new coal plant emissions What’s Greener In Europe — A Train, A Plane, Or A Car? What’s Dirtiest? Polestar 0: A Truly Carbon-Neutral Car By 2030 University researchers raise a toast to biofuel prospects How can small renewable power producers help the Philippines reach its 35% clean energy target? New report hails the decade of renewables as 2020 hits capacity record Low Carbon Aluminum Boosted By Audi’s Use In Automotive First To avoid future pandemics, reverse the destruction of ecosystems Eni’s new treatment plant begins operations Smart energy managed service stations coming in Singapore Is 2021 when net zero targets become a central focus for world leaders? Australia ranked worst in world on Covid recovery spending on green options How wind power is leading America’s energy transition Indoor-Grown Weed Is Spewing Carbon Into the Atmosphere China selects Siemens Energy transformers for first 66kV offshore wind farm LG Energy Solution to invest $4.5bn in US battery production expansion Waning support for nuclear power 10 years after Fukushima Enterprises’ sustainable development contributes to Việt Nam’s prosperity: PM Grab is hatching a carbon-cutting plan Tata Power unveils blockchain-enabled solar trading for Delhi customers Construction set to start on Australia’s first lithium-ion battery manufacturing plant UK Ford Mustang Mach-E Buyers Get Big Charging Boost Via BP Pulse Network Solar power’s future could soon be overshadowed Why a managed shift away from fossil fuels is essential and urgent. Including for petrostates. Dangerous narratives and climate migration IEA releases India Energy Outlook 2021 report

What’s Greener In Europe — A Train, A Plane, Or A Car? What’s Dirtiest?

For as long as I can remember, word on the street has been that trains are much greener than planes. Nonetheless, some regulations changed, some entrepreneurs had big dreams, and low-cost regional flights took off (no pun intended) in Europe. You can see in the graph below that passenger-km more than doubled from 1995 to 2018.

You can also see in the next two charts that CO2e emissions approximately doubled for EU-27 international air travel from 1990 to 2018 while final energy consumption in the rail sector steadily declined in the EU-27 during that period of time.

Recently, the European Environment Information and Observation Network (Eionet), a network of the European Environment Agency (EEA) and its 38 member and cooperating countries, decided to look more closely at emissions by transportation sector, on an absolute and relative basis, and examine the environmental effect of trains versus planes for regional European trips.

The European Union has some of the best targets in the world for cutting greenhouse gas emissions and doing its part to slow and eventually stop global heating. Transportation is one of its biggest challenges, though, and the European Green Deal “includes the objective of reducing greenhouse gas emission from transport by 90% by 2050 compared with 1990.” According to the EEA, this new report concludes that, yes, shifting more people from planes to trains could help with this objective.

As it turns out, there is nothing surprising about which mode of transport is greenest — a good ole electric train. “Aviation’s emission impacts are much higher on a passenger-kilometre basis.” There was one potential surprise, though. Flying is reportedly not the worst (aka dirtiest) option. “Travel by a petrol or diesel-powered car, especially if traveling alone, can be more harmful.” (Yikes!)

Interestingly, the researchers also find that an electric car is even slightly better than high-speed rail if 4 people are in the car. If it’s only one person driving, taking a train is much better, but driving an electric car still solidly beats air travel.

If the electric car is charging 100% on renewable energy (as some networks offer), then the equation surely looks a bit better for electric cars.

Of course, telecommuting or vacationing at home beat them all!

For much more detail, view the full report here.

 


 


Appreciate CleanTechnica’s originality? Consider becoming a CleanTechnica Member, Supporter, Technician, or Ambassador — or a patron on Patreon.

 

Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

 

New Podcast: Cruise Talks Autonomous Driving Tech, Regulations, & Auto Design

 

New Podcast: Battery Mineral Mining Policies & Regional Trends

Source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *